Powerful LED Workbench Light on the Cheap

For a while I have been looking to instal LED lighting in my workshop,10wLED but every time I go to the DIY center, I look at the price tags and keep on walking. About a month ago, the Electronics Goldmine had a sale on 12V/10W/900 Lumen LEDs. $3 each! 900 lumens is equivalent to a 60 watt incandescent bulb. The datasheet I am using is here.

Once I received the LEDs, a quick test with my powersupply demonstrated them working VERY well, but running them from my bench supply would not do in the long term. A solution had to be found in my parts bin…

Ingredients:

  • 19v 1.5A Notebook power supply
  • 2x 10W LEDs
  • Pentium II heatsink with fan
  • 12v regulator LM7812
  • rack mounting hardware
LED light in action. Note the very ancient, Made in USA heatsink compound tube!

LED light in action. Note the very ancient, Made in USA heatsink compound tube!

The two LEDs are connected in series, to allow a 19v power supply to be used. The LEDs are mounted on the Pentium II heatsink and the van is powered via the 12v regulator, also mounted to the heatsink. I borrowed my daughter’s pink(!) hot glue gun to keep the cables in place.

Total cost is less than $10. Sure beats the DIY store price! Is it beautiful? Nope… but who cares, my workbench is now superbright! Need another one for the other end of the workbench. ## come here little¬†powersupply! be a good boy! ##

LEDs mounted and ready.

LEDs mounted and ready.

An FYI on the heatsink: These high power LEDs need to be kept cool to ensure their longevity. The Pentium II heatsink might be sufficient without the fan, but why take the risk… it’s already there!

Computer rack mounting parts attach the new LED light to the ceiling.

Computer rack mounting parts attach the new LED light to the ceiling.

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5 thoughts on “Powerful LED Workbench Light on the Cheap

      1. Elmars Post author

        George-
        Posted a new article describing a simple constant current driver that can be used with a power LED. The circuit will help protect the LED from over voltage by capping the current the LED can pass.

        http://wp.me/p442QB-4X

        Elmars

    1. Elmars Post author

      I like your garden lamp. I am working on something similar, first for the pool, then for pathway illumination. In a few days I will be posting a simple power regulator for these LEDs that you may find interesting. I updated the first paragraph in the article with a link to the datasheet I am using. Hopefully that will come in handy.

      Reply

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